Bret Easton Ellis Podcast – Youth At The Movies

Check out Bret Easton Ellis podcast.

I listened to the latest episode of this with Michael Tolkin – near the end there’s a good conversation about cinema in modern day life.

Paraphrased:

BBE: That idea with the relationship you have with the content now, with the active control of the content, rather than being the person who lets it flow over you. Some people think something is lost with that. I know that my boyfriend who’s in his twenties and others at that age who tell me that they can’t go to a movie theatre to sit and watch a movie for two hours and ten minutes because they get itchy.

MT: Yeah, I think there’s something on the way that is gonna be like a melt of one of those glaciers in Antartica. Something is going to happen very quickly that’s going to swamp Hollywood. I have a twenty-two year old and a twenty-seven year old and I talk to them and their friends – they HATE the movies. They LOATHE the movies. They loathe what the movies are about. They don’t care about the movie stars.

Everybody talks about binging on Netflix. I don’t even have the patience for hour-long episodes unless something is REALLLLLLLLYYY GOOD.1

Via: Lefsetz.

…the truth is people are overwhelmed with grazing, there’s so much information, that they can only go deep in a few areas, and those in the arts just cannot fathom this.


  1. Which I don’t think Orange Is The New Black is after two episodes. “But give it a chance” you might say. But there’s already so much stuff. Also, how come all the REALLY GOOD movies aren’t on Netflix? I’m thinking of giving up my subscription because I end up just rewatching stuff I’ve seen before because I KNOW it’s good. I don’t want to waste time on anything less. If Netflix has taught me anything it’s that you need to pay more than $10 a month to see good movies. 

Less Variety On The Radio…and In The Culture

The Wall Street Journal reports on radio these days.

Faced with growing competition from digital alternatives, traditional broadcasters have managed to expand their listenership with an unlikely tactic: offering less variety than ever.

The strategy is based on a growing amount of research that shows in increasingly granular detail what radio programmers have long believed—listeners tend to stay tuned when they hear a familiar song, and tune out when they hear music they don’t recognize.

I think this is true with more than just music. The dream of the internet was to bring about a diversity of opinion, points-of-view, and art. But it hasn’t been the case. At large, people are just going to refine a razor sharp focus on what they already like, what confirms what they already believe, and ignore anything that doesn’t fit those views.

It’s not because people are ignorant. It’s because there’s a ton of stuff available and this is the most efficient way of processing it.

“The Quality of Music and The Conformity of Youth”

The real reason album sales are down is because there’s too much good music out there being made by a ridiculously diverse bunch of people. We’re being overloaded with amazing albums and people just can’t keep up. I’m not fucking kidding here. If you can’t find good music in this day and age, then you aren’t trying.

Every generation thinks the best music is the music they grew up with.

“How Food Replaced Art as High Culture”

Foodism has taken on the sociological characteristics of what used to be known — in the days of the rising postwar middle class, when Mortimer Adler was peddling the Great Books and Leonard Bernstein was on television — as culture. It is costly. It requires knowledge and connoisseurship, which are themselves costly to develop. It is a badge of membership in the higher classes, an ideal example of what Thorstein Veblen, the great social critic of the Gilded Age, called conspicuous consumption. It is a vehicle of status aspiration and competition, an ever-present occasion for snobbery, one-upmanship and social aggression.

Kyle Kinane on Pot Culture

From Stop Podcasting Yourself 236 and a discussion on medical marijuana.

California has all the dispensaries, but you can’t keep telling me it’s medicine and then it’s called something like “DOCTOR DUDE’S FUN PALACE!” in Wavy Gravy font. Make it look like a legitimate place. No doctor’s office ever employed tie-dye this much. I’m fine with pot, but pot culture is the dumbest shit.