Also “find your passion”

When The Earth Stopped Moving and the Sun Wouldn’t Rise

One summer as a teenager, I think when I was 13, my brother and I went to a summer camp for a week. It was our first time away away from home without our parents for longer than a few days. We slept in a cabin in bunk beds nearby other kids we just met. There were public bathrooms. You’d have to wait in line for showers. You’d have to wait in line for showers at 7 in the morning. That sort of thing.

As a kid who spent his summers playing Nintendo, I hated the first couple of days.

One morning the camp counselors woke us all up – a siren blared on the campgrounds. It was still dark. We were told to meet by the flagpole on the grounds for an important announcement, where we were told by counselors that overnight the planet had stopped moving and the sun wouldn’t rise.

Top scientists were working on understanding what had happened. Although it felt like it was about 3 in the morning, clocks were set to our usual wake-up time of 7 AM. We were told we would start the day as we normally would. We all got ready for the day, went to the camp mess hall for breakfast, and did our standard morning activities and games outside in the dark.

Hours later we were told that scientists had discovered that nothing alarming had occurred, that they had figured everything out, but we were to all go back to sleep and get back in sync with the rotation of the Earth. We were all sent back to our bunks and slept for a few hours.

That summer I looked at that morning as some fun silliness that camp counselors had concocted to mess with kids. Then, years later, somebody had asked if I had ever seen an albino – someone with a pigmentation problem.

I have – there was one at that summer camp. I remember the feeling of seeing something like this for the first time, his skin bright white, hair bright blond. This kid had to be careful of sunlight – he had an umbrella, he hung out by the trees. Why his parents sent him to a summer camp I’ll never understand. Maybe for him to learn some social skills.

But then it hit me – maybe the Earth stopped moving and the sun didn’t shine for just a few hours so he could have some kind of normalcy and play kick the can.

This iTunes Mini Player Behavior Drives Me Nuts

Just stay where I put you!

I’ve hoped that iTunes Mini Player would be a good replacement for the Coversutra / Bowtie apps, but since the album art doesn’t stick to the desktop it’s like I’m always wrestling with that window when I try to use it that way.

Life Isn’t THAT Short

Howard Stern on GTD

Creative Diagnoses in Dentistry

Reading stuff like this I wonder how much oil changes would cost if they were covered by your car insurance.

“In recent years, I have been seeing more and more creative diagnosis,” Camm told me when I called him at his practice in Washington state. A dentist, he said, might think, “‘Well, the insurance covers this crown, so I’m not hurting this patient, so why don’t I just do it?’ That’s the absolutely wrong approach.”

…that’s kind of a good point

Fill Out Your Baby Profile

Didn’t know this was an option on WebMD.

“Seems like a minor story”

When you read Fast Company you get gems like this

icecream

“We have only scratched the surface of what’s possible in ice cream.”

If Megalodon Were Around Today

…nope.

Cool it with the huge signatures

Now We Just have Gamefaqs

On the Chrono Trigger Strategy Guide from Michael P. Williams’s Chrono Trigger book:

This Player’s Guide was released by Nintendo in October 1995, a few months after the game’s North American debut. Billed on the cover as “the complete guide to the past, present and future—straight from the pros at Nintendo,” the large-format guide in fact leaves much unsaid. Unlike the colorful early strategy guides from Japan, Chrono Trigger Player’s Guide is a mostly no-nonsense document. There are no illustrated bestiaries, no bonus comics, no interviews, and no mail-in prize giveaways. And a later unofficial guide from BradyGames published to coincide with the PlayStation port feels more like a technical report than a companion for playtime.

One of my high school friends had a brother playing through Final Fantasy 3 with those HUGE BradyGames guides – I think it had a table of EVERY SINGLE PIECE OF ARMOR AND WEAPONS in the game – it took about something like 100 pages.

Branding

“How U2 Blew It”

Bob Lefsetz:

This looked like nothing so much as what it was, old farts using their connections to shove material down the throats of those who don’t want it. It’s what we hate so much about today’s environment, rich people who think they know better and our entitled to their behavior.

For a moment I thought I’d have to explain to my mom and dad why there’s a U2 album that came out of nowhere on their iDevices – then I remembered that they don’t even touch the Music app.